On hitlers mountain book review

Only the people that lived in Nazi Germany can truly say and they are now few and far between. After those years, many chose not to speak of them again.

On hitlers mountain book review

Welcome to my blog! Here you will find reviews of books I'm reading, commentary on discussions in contemporary literature and popular fiction, and resources for book lovers. My Nazi Childhood, succinctly defines the task of her book: Hunt explores every facet of family life during the early chapters which describe her youth.

Recounting how her grandparents and parents met, and the various jobs they did to be able to survive occupies much of the initial chapters. Utilizing anecdotes and interviews from family members throughout the book, Hunt is able to recount the earliest moments of her childhood, including her birth, with alarmingly specific detail.

A minor, but powerful example is when Hunt describes the traditional Christmas songs her family used to sing, which are soon replaced by Nazi-approved lyrics.

At first, Nazism seems distant, but it soon becomes very real and concrete. She manages to simultaneously express childlike wonder and adult wisdom when relaying her experiences. Other times, Hunt masters a mixture of sardonic irony and bitter, unforgiving sarcasm in her prose.

Throughout the novel, events throughout the war such as the invasion of Czechoslovakia, the annex of the Sudetenland, and most importantly for Hunt, the invasion of Poland in are intertwined with her family history, presenting them as significant markers in her lifetime.

The reality of war and the inevitability of our personal involvement suddenly became clear to her in a way it had not before. The reader appreciates her inclusion of historical detail, which is unassumingly presented.

On hitlers mountain book review

Her prose, colored by the German language, makes the history both accessible and interesting, if only relevant because it directly impacts her daily routine.

Each chapter is filled with German words and expressions that authenticate the memoir and recreate the era. It is clear that Hunt maintains an affinity for her mother tongue, not only because of the sheer amount of German words which are used, but also because of the careful selection of words that convey both nostalgia and great emotional depth.

Likely familiar with the lexicon of the Second World War, the average reader will recognize words like Luftwaffe and Lebensraum. Words like Setzkasten, however, are ones the reader learns to appreciate: A tool used to form syllables and words, the Setzkasten that Hunt inherited from an older child was missing several of its original cardboard letters.

Hunt provides, when available, direct English translations for German words. Photographs and captions further personalize the memoir and strengthen its overall impact. There are just as many, if not more, images of Adolph Hitler himself, including a brooding, yet intimate, profile of him surveying the landscape on Obersalzburg.

A striking portrait of Hitler holding two small, distinctly Aryan children on his lap evokes fear and discomfort: Hunt includes not only photographs of people, but also of objects and places that are directly related to her story. The captions to these photographs are as much a part of the memoir as the images they accompany; not only do they provide an explanation for what is in each picture, but they also offer uncluttered, powerful statements.

Readers will marvel at anecdotes that reveal what life in Nazi Germany was like for school-aged children. Descriptions of emergency preparedness training at school illustrate Hunt and her classmates learning to breathe through gas masks and evacuate to bomb shelters.

A Girl and Her Books: Review of On Hitler's Mountain by Irmgard Hunt

Hunt recounts a conversation with a school teacher who bribes her with cookies to repeat the condemning things her grandfather had to say about Hitler. Later, she is treated like a pseudo-celebrity by adults who find out she lives in close proximity to Hitler and has even been photographed sitting on his knee; this revelation causes her to be favored by her fanatical Nazi teachers, who rejoice in having her stand in front of her classmates and recite the gruesome details of how her father died fighting for Hitler.

He is the presence that looms over every fact of her childhood, lurking throughout the school day as she is educated, smiling from the painted faces of the dolls sent by Frau Goring, hiding in the words of holiday songs, and living on the mountain just beyond her home.

Military Religious Freedom Foundation Protecting the Constitutional Guarantee of Separation of Church and State in the United States Military. In her nonfiction book, On Hitler’s Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood, the author gives us an accurate account of German society before, during, and after the reign of one of the most evil men who ever lived. AS EASTER APPROACHES, when Christians reflect on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the Holocaust Hoax will be in our faces once again. “Holocaust Remembrance Week,” (carefully arranged in the very same month Christians honor Christ’s resurrection), will be replete with tax-payer.

Her book is a living testament for anyone who lived, like her, in those uncertain and fearful times and searched for first for answers, and later for reconciliation; it preserves the aspects of childhood worth nostalgia and gives new life to those that were absorbed and destroyed by Nazi culture.May 22,  · Review of On Hitler's Mountain by Irmgard Hunt “A universal answer may never be found, but perhaps an examination of just one family, mine, can provide additional understanding of what paved the way to Hitler’s success and led to wholesale disaster” (x).

The memoir "On Hitler's Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood," by Irmgard A. Hunt, provides an indispensable personal perspective, one that the author was compelled to share.

On hitlers mountain book review

Hunt was born in , a time in which the Third Reich was increasingly shaping the country in which she was destined to spend her childhood. Culture › Books › Reviews On Hitler's Mountain, by Irmgard Hunt Hunt was born in Berchtesgaden, just below Obersalzberg, where Hitler built his Eagle's Nest estate.

Otherwise, her family. Military Religious Freedom Foundation Protecting the Constitutional Guarantee of Separation of Church and State in the United States Military. AS EASTER APPROACHES, when Christians reflect on the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the Holocaust Hoax will be in our faces once again.

“Holocaust Remembrance Week,” (carefully arranged in the very same month Christians honor Christ’s resurrection), will be replete with tax-payer. About Balakuteera. Founded in , BALAKUTEERA Montessori House of Children is an independent school run by the BALAKUTEERA Educational Trust.

It offers a pre-primary programme for children aged 2 to 6 years.

On Hitler's Mountain: Overcoming the Legacy of a Nazi Childhood -- book review