Essay on albert namatjira

An Aboriginal community in north-west Western Australia tells the story of the killing in by local pastoralists and police of family members at Mowla Bluff. See, among other sources, Wikipedia entry on Windradyne at http: Includes reference to massacres in Victoria.

Essay on albert namatjira

Namatjira, Rising Water The notion of "authenticity" in art has whiskers all over it. Art, by definition, is artifice, mimicry, representation: This generates one of the central paradoxes of art: It goes through you, like wine through water, and changes the colour of your soul.

It is a quality at home in any form, and therefore as indefinable as it is recognisable. This quality might, as Viktor Shklovsky hints, come down to something as simple as the changes registered in a work of art, its movement from one state to another, mimicking similar psychic and physical states within wider human experience.

Essay on albert namatjira

Whatever it is, it is experienced as a sense of truthfulness: While truthfulness emerges from within the work itself, authenticity is a kind of certificate, an extrinsic guarantee that the work is, in some way, "genuine". In literature, for example, the author is often the guarantor, feeding a public hunger for the authentic that somehow elides the whole question of fictional truthfulness or even imagination.

This is, of course, the primary reason for literary hoaxes like Helen Demidenko or Norma Khouri. Namatjira, which opened last week at the Malthouse after a hugely successful Sydney season at Belvoir St, plays authenticity against truthfulness in deeply revealing ways. I first encountered Big hArt with the production Ngapartji Ngapartjiwhich featured in the Melbourne Festival, and later saw a moving documentary on their community work in the Northcott Housing Project in Sydney, which resulted in a Sydney Festival performance called Sticky Bricks.

Namatjira, which narrates the story of the hugely popular Aboriginal painter Albert Namatjira, is one aspect of a community project in Hermannsburg, Central Australia which, as the program note explains, "is designed to leave lasting legacies beyond this touring performance".

When work like this is presented in the privileged, middle class setting of a theatre, it risks being merely worthy, served up with a sense of piety that replaces vitality and, worst of all, art itself. Big hArt are upfront about seeking connection with their audiences, and in their oscillation between these contradictory qualities of truthfulness and authenticity, this is what they achieve.

The key is the art. Namatjira, written and directed by Scott Rankin, is a supple mediation between the artifice of theatre - highlighted in the charismatic central performance of Trevor Jamieson, the major narrator, and his offsider Derik Lynch - and the realities that the story of Namatjira reveals, signalled by the presence of his inheritors on stage.

Into this are layered the mediations of painting itself. The performance unfolds in what is effectively a giant, dynamic work of visual art.

Our complete Library Catalogue. Inspired by the random and organic display of produce in the markets of his native #UnitedArabEmirates artist #HassanSharif also renders the mass-produced object handmade with his simple cutting and tying gestures, here on display for #APT9 @qagoma in Brisbane until 28 April Ian MacNeill is an arts journalist with a special interest in bringing neglected areas to light. His last book was Sweet Horizons: A History of the Solomon Islands ().

As the audience enters, Robert Hannaford is hard at work on stage, painting a portrait of Trevor Jamieson, who sits patiently as the artist darts back and forth from the canvas to his palette.

Before a word is spoken, we are already in a complex world of representation.

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The story itself is a fascinating fable of colonial Australia, at once tragic and hopeful. He was the first Aboriginal given citizenship, although this honour was conferred so he could be taxed. There are also the various rip-offs - his desperate selling of his copyright, his unsuccessful bid to buy a cattle station - which demonstrated that, for all his fame, he was still a second-class citizen.The Namatjira Project is an Australian community cultural development project, launched in , conducted by arts and social change company Big benjaminpohle.com is based in the Indigenous (Aboriginal) communities of Hermannsburg (NT) and Alice Springs in the Northern Territory of Australia.

Its focus is the life and work of the late Albert Namatjira, . The artist Albert Namatjira was born on 28 July, Despite being raised in traditional Western Australian culture of the time, his birth name was Elea Namatjira. Albert Namatjira (28 July – 8 August ), born Elea Namatjira, was an Indigenous Australian artist.

He is one of Australia's most well-known painters. He is best known for his watercolour paintings of the Australian outback landscape. Aug 18,  · Namatjira, which narrates the story of the hugely popular Aboriginal painter Albert Namatjira, is one aspect of a community project in Hermannsburg, Central Australia which, as the program note explains, "is designed to leave lasting legacies beyond this touring performance".

It's this profound level of engagement which gives Author: theatre notes. Inspired by the random and organic display of produce in the markets of his native #UnitedArabEmirates artist #HassanSharif also renders the mass-produced object handmade with his simple cutting and tying gestures, here on display for #APT9 @qagoma in Brisbane until 28 April Ian MacNeill is an arts journalist with a special interest in bringing neglected areas to light.

His last book was Sweet Horizons: A History of the Solomon Islands ().

Essay on albert namatjira
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